Kerry James Marshall at Prospect.3

Chicago-based artist Kerry James Marshall travels to the Prospect.3 biennial in New Orleans, Louisiana and speaks with five fellow artists and one collective: Zarouhie Abdalian, William Cordova, Lonnie Holley, Yun-Fei Ji, Christopher Myers, and The Propeller Group. “When I talk to other artists I’m interested in hearing how they read their subjectivity and how it drives and motivates what they do,” says Marshall. “We [all] come from different positions at different times and we mean to make work for different purposes.” For Marshall, a biennial presents an opportunity to “try out something more experimental.” His site-specific installation of futuristic gold plexiglass alcoves in the windows of the Ashé Cultural Arts Center creates “an otherworldly space” that “cuts against the grain of a kind of abjection that people associate with the recovery from [Hurricane] Katrina.” Prospect.3 is on view October 25, 2014 through January 25, 2015.

Artists in this Episode

Zarouhie Abdalian
Featured

Zarouhie Abdalian

B. 1982, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Lives and works in Oakland, California
William Cordova
Featured

William Cordova

B. 1971, Lima, Peru
Lives and works between Lima, Miami, and New York City

Lonnie Holley
Featured

Lonnie Holley

B. 1950, Birmingham, Alabama, USA
Lives and works in Birmingham, Alabama
Yun-Fei Ji
Featured

Yun-Fei Ji

B. 1963, Beijing, China
Lives and works between Beijing and New York City

Kerry James Marshall
Host

Kerry James Marshall

B. 1955, Birmingham, Alabama, USA
Lives and works in Chicago, Illinois
Christopher Myers
Featured

Christopher Myers

B. 1974, Queens, New York, USA
Lives and works in Brooklyn, New York

The Propeller Group
Featured

The Propeller Group

Est. 2006 in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Members live and work between Ho Chi Minh City and Los Angeles

Credits

Artist to Artist Created & Produced by: Ian Forster. Editor: Morgan Riles. Cinematography: Ian Forster. Sound: Kyle Sheehan. Production Assistant: Christoph Lerch. Music: Pinch Music. Artists: Zarouhie Abdalian, William Cordova, Lonnie Holley, Yun-Fei Ji, Kerry James Marshall, Christopher Myers & The Propeller Group. Locations: Ashé Cultural Arts Center, Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans, Dillard University, New Orleans African American Museum, University of New Orleans St. Claude Gallery, and Xavier University. Thanks: Prospect New Orleans, Brooke Davis Anderson, Franklin Sirmans, David Zwirner Gallery, Jack Shainman Gallery, James Cohan Gallery, Koplin Del Rio Gallery, Lombard Freid Gallery, and Sikkema Jenkins & Co. An ART21 Workshop Production. © ART21, Inc. 2014. All Rights Reserved.

Kerry James Marshall at Prospect.3 was supported, in part, by The Lambent Foundation and by individual contributors.

About Prospect New Orleans

Prospect New Orleans was founded in 2007, in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, with the goal of showcasing new artistic practices from around the world and contributing to the cultural economy of the gulf region. Dan Cameron, the founder of U.S. Biennial, Inc, the nonprofit that produces Prospect New Orleans, mounted the first edition of the biennial. Prospect.1 was the largest contemporary art biennial in US history, featuring artists from around the globe, many of whom are featured in ART21 films: Allora & Calzadilla, El Anatsui, Janine Antoni, Mark Bradford, Cai Guo Qiang, Cao Fei, Katharina Grosse, Trenton Doyle Hancock, Arturo Herrera, William Kentridge, Kalup Linzy, and Julie Mehretu. In the years since, Prospect New Orleans has shifted from a biennial to a triennial exhibition, sprawling across the city with installations in major cultural institutions, community centers, commercial businesses, and public spaces. Organized by Franklin Sirmans, a curator at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Prospect.3 features over fifty-eight artists at eighteen venues. Subtitled "Notes for Now," this edition of the biennial is intended to be a "conversation about the ways in which artists examine the creation of community, the necessities of beauty and the consequences of our contemporary times."


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