• 001_nycu_artwork_laser

    Laser worked with dancer Ariel Freedman to adapt gestures, made during speeches, by an international range of politicians in 2013. The selection of speeches is based on the time and place of each performance and accrues current events every time it is performed.

    Liz Magic Laser, Stand Behind Me, 2013. Performance and two-channel video; 10 minutes. Performance view: Lisson Gallery, London. Featuring dancer Ariel Freedman. Costume Stylist: Felicia Garcia-Rivera. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


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    Laser worked with dancer Ariel Freedman to adapt gestures, made during speeches, by an international range of politicians in 2013. The selection of speeches is based on the time and place of each performance and accrues current events every time it is performed.

    Liz Magic Laser, Stand Behind Me, 2013. Performance and two-channel video; 10 minutes. Performance view: Lisson Gallery, London. Featuring dancer Ariel Freedman. Costume Stylist: Felicia Garcia-Rivera. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


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    Utilizing the format of a political talk show, a dialogue is posed between political experts, television media, and the audience. A panel reflects upon their previous on-camera experiences, comparing times when they felt authentic to times when they felt manipulative. In a separate location, an invited audience watches and responds via live video while the separate feeds are edited together in a control room.

    Liz Magic Laser, Tell Me What You Want to Hear, 2013. Performance and three-channel video; 60 minutes. Commissioned by DiverseWorks in collaboration with University of Houston's Jack J. Valenti School of Communications. Featuring Nick Anderson, Shannon Buggs, Maurice Duhon, Lizette Garcia, Linda Lorelle and Mustafa Tameez. Executive Producers Keith Houk and Randy Polk; and Assistant Director Sofia Pontén. Filmed on location at DiverseWorks and University of Houston. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


  • 004_nycu_artwork_laser

    Utilizing the format of a political talk show, a dialogue is posed between political experts, television media, and the audience. A panel reflects upon their previous on-camera experiences, comparing times when they felt authentic to times when they felt manipulative. In a separate location, an invited audience watches and responds via live video while the separate feeds are edited together in a control room.

    Liz Magic Laser, Tell Me What You Want to Hear, video stills, 2013. Performance and three-channel video; 60 minutes. Commissioned by DiverseWorks in collaboration with University of Houston's Jack J. Valenti School of Communications. Featuring Nick Anderson, Shannon Buggs, Maurice Duhon, Lizette Garcia, Linda Lorelle and Mustafa Tameez. Executive Producers Keith Houk and Randy Polk; and Assistant Director Sofia Pontén. Filmed on location at DiverseWorks and University of Houston. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


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    Laser used the structure of a television news program as the basis for an adaptation of Jean-Paul Sartre’s No Exit (Huis Clos). The three characters in the play are recast in archetypical news program roles: an anchorman in the studio, a reporter on location, and a “real” person who gives testimony in a domestic space. Laser’s process parallels Sartre’s plot of people trapped in their relationships in a room they could not escape.

    Liz Magic Laser, In Camera, production still, 2012. Five-channel video installation; 121 minutes. Featuring actors Anders E Larsson, Karin Hallén and Maria Lindh. Produced by Malmö Konsthall in collaboration with SVT. Script adapted by Liz Magic Laser and Sofia Pontén from Jean Paul Sartre’s No Exit (Huis Clos) (1944). Photo: Kasper Akhøj. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


  • 006_nycu_artwork_laser

    Laser used the structure of a television news program as the basis for an adaptation of Jean-Paul Sartre’s No Exit (Huis Clos). The three characters in the play are recast in archetypical news program roles: an anchorman in the studio, a reporter on location, and a “real” person who gives testimony in a domestic space. Laser’s process parallels Sartre’s plot of people trapped in their relationships in a room they could not escape.

    Liz Magic Laser, In Camera, 2012. Five-channel video installation; 121 minutes. Featuring actors Anders E Larsson, Karin Hallén and Maria Lindh. Produced by Malmö Konsthall in collaboration with SVT. Script adapted by Liz Magic Laser and Sofia Pontén from Jean Paul Sartre’s No Exit (Huis Clos) (1944). Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


  • 007_nycu_artwork_laser

    Laser used the structure of a television news program as the basis for an adaptation of Jean-Paul Sartre’s No Exit (Huis Clos). The three characters in the play are recast in archetypical news program roles: an anchorman in the studio, a reporter on location, and a “real” person who gives testimony in a domestic space. Laser’s process parallels Sartre’s plot of people trapped in their relationships in a room they could not escape.

    Liz Magic Laser, In Camera, production stills, 2012. Five-channel video installation; 121 minutes. Featuring actors Anders E Larsson, Karin Hallén and Maria Lindh. Produced by Malmö Konsthall in collaboration with SVT. Script adapted by Liz Magic Laser and Sofia Pontén from Jean Paul Sartre’s No Exit (Huis Clos) (1944). Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


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    Enlisting the help of a market research analyst to conduct a series of focus groups, Laser had The Armory Show invite members of the arts community—a range of collectors, curators, museum professionals, art advisors, and critics—to participate in group discussions that would ultimately determine how she would lend her identity to The Armory Show.

    Liz Magic Laser, Artist’s Proof, 2013. The Armory Show Centennial Edition art fair booth: modular hollow core panels, industrial carpet, Luan plywood, MDF, laminate, aluminum metal, paint, office chairs, display monitors, display vitrine, acrylic glass, doorway, black curtain, curtain rod, two-way mirrored window, spotlights, The Armory Show Focus Group (2012-2013) video (edition 1 of 5), Sony 40 inch HD monitor, security camera and DVR system, and performance; 120 x 166 x 192 inches. An Armory Show Commission produced in association with David Guinan of Polemic Media. Featuring focus group moderator Ben Allen of Labrador Agency. Courtesy the artist and Various Small Fires, Los Angeles. © Liz Magic Laser


  • 009_nycu_artwork_laser

    Enlisting the help of a market research analyst to conduct a series of focus groups, Laser had The Armory Show invite members of the arts community—a range of collectors, curators, museum professionals, art advisors, and critics—to participate in group discussions that would ultimately determine how she would lend her identity to The Armory Show.

    Liz Magic Laser, The Armory Show 2013 Visual Identity, 2013. Signed Artist Proofs of The Armory Show VIP paraphernalia; 72 x 36 x 54 inches. Courtesy the artist and Various Small Fires, Los Angeles. © Liz Magic Laser


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    Enlisting the help of a market research analyst to conduct a series of focus groups, Laser had The Armory Show invite members of the arts community—a range of collectors, curators, museum professionals, art advisors, and critics—to participate in group discussions that would ultimately determine how she would lend her identity to The Armory Show.

    Liz Magic Laser, The Armory Show Focus Group, video stills, 2013. Digital video; 30 minutes. An Armory Show commission produced in association with David Guinan of Polemic Media. Featuring focus group moderator Ben Allen of Labrador Agency. Courtesy the artist and Various Small Fires, Los Angeles. © Liz Magic Laser


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    Using the set design and methodologies associated with a news bureau as a functional backdrop, Laser transformed the Lower East Side storefront into a “situation room” for two months where she developed a series of performances based on the Living Newspaper theatrical form.

    Liz Magic Laser, Studio on the Street, 2012. Performance; two months. Performance view: Forever & Today, Inc., New York. Liz Magic Laser, artist-in-residence, working in studio with actress Annie Fox. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


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    Living Newspaper (2012-ongoing) is a series of installations, performances, and videos that seek to investigate and alter the relationship between the news media and the public.

    Liz Magic Laser, Living Newspaper: Weekly, 2012. Performance view: Swiss Institute, New York, August 16, 2012. Curated by Ingrid Chu and Savannah Gorton, commissioned by Forever & Today, Inc., and presented in partnership with Swiss Institute. Featuring actors Audrey Crabtree, Ray Field and Lia Woertendyke. Videographer: Niknaz Tavakolian. Costume Adviser: Zulema Griffin. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


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    Living Newspaper (2012-ongoing) is a series of installations, performances, and videos that seek to investigate and alter the relationship between the news media and the public.

    Liz Magic Laser, Living Newspaper: Friday, July 13th, 2012 Edition, 2012. Performance views: Family Business, New York. Featuring actors Audrey Crabtree, Annie Fox, Frederic Nwaha Lindjeck, Liz Micek, Jeff Seal, Michael Wiener, and Lia Woertendyke. In collaboration with producer David Guinan of Polemic Media; journalistic dramaturge Roman Léandre Schmidt of Courrier International; resident playwright Hanna Novak; costume advisor Zuzka Kurtz; production assistant Moriah Askenaizer; and project advisor RoseLee Goldberg


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    Living Newspaper (2012-ongoing) is a series of installations, performances, and videos that seek to investigate and alter the relationship between the news media and the public.

    Liz Magic Laser, Push Poll, video stills, 2012. Single-channel video; 9 minutes 45 seconds. Featuring actors Annie Fox, Liz Micek, and Michael Wiener; and focus group moderator Ben Allen of Labrador Agency. Commissioned by CNN; video produced in association with CNN, Polemic Media and Performa. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


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    Two dancers replicated the gestural movement from two State of the Union addresses: President Barack Obama’s 2012 speech and President George H. W. Bush’s 1990 speech. The title references the ideas of François Delsarte who developed oratorical theories and exercises in the early nineteenth century. In Delsarte’s vocabulary “digital” refers to fingers.

    Liz Magic Laser, The Digital Face, video stills, 2012. Performance and two-channel video; 10 minutes. Featuring dancers Alan Good and Cori Kresge as former President George H. W. Bush and President Barack Obama. Performance view: Derek Eller Gallery, New York. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser. Featured in the film Liz Magic Laser Talks to the Hand


  • 016_nycu_artwork_laser

    Two dancers replicated the gestural movement from two State of the Union addresses: President Barack Obama’s 2012 speech and President George H. W. Bush’s 1990 speech. The title references the ideas of François Delsarte who developed oratorical theories and exercises in the early nineteenth century. In Delsarte’s vocabulary “digital” refers to fingers.

    Liz Magic Laser, The Digital Face, video stills, 2012. Performance and two-channel video; 10 minutes. Featuring dancers Alan Good and Cori Kresge as former President George H. W. Bush and President Barack Obama. Performance view: MoMA PS1, Long Island City. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser. Featured in the film Liz Magic Laser Talks to the Hand


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    Liz Magic Laser, The Digital Face, 2012. Digital c-print; 10 x 30 inches. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser. Featured in the film Liz Magic Laser Talks to the Hand


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    Staged in a movie theater, the performance takes place simultaneously in the midst of the audience and on the cinema’s screen. As the actors perform, selected footage from three cinematographers is projected onto the screen in a continuous live-feed while Laser acts as real time editor to produce a live film. The performance draws on a variety of agitprop theater tactics, particularly the Russian Constructivist idea of a “living newspaper.”

    Liz Magic Laser, I Feel Your Pain, 2011. Performance and single-channel video; 80 minutes. A Performa Commission. Performance view Performa 11, SVA Silas Theatre, New York. Featuring actors Lynn Berg, Audrey Crabtree, Ray Field, Annie Fox, Kathryn Grody, Rafael Jordan, Liz Micek, and Ryan Shams. Video made with producer David Guinan and cinematographers Matthew Nauser and Collin Kornfeind of Polemic Media. Photo: Yola Monakhov. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser. Featured in the film Liz Magic Laser Feeeeeeeeeeeeels Your Pain


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    Staged in a movie theater, the performance takes place simultaneously in the midst of the audience and on the cinema’s screen. As the actors perform, selected footage from three cinematographers is projected onto the screen in a continuous live-feed while Laser acts as real time editor to produce a live film. The performance draws on a variety of agitprop theater tactics, particularly the Russian Constructivist idea of a “living newspaper.”

    Liz Magic Laser, I Feel Your Pain, production and video stills, 2011. Performance and single-channel video; 80 minutes. A Performa Commission. Featuring actors Lynn Berg, Audrey Crabtree, Ray Field, Annie Fox, Kathryn Grody, Rafael Jordan, Liz Micek, and Ryan Shams. Video made with producer David Guinan and cinematographers Matthew Nauser and Collin Kornfeind of Polemic Media. Photos: Kasper Akhøj, Paula Court, and Yola Monakhov. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser. Featured in the film Liz Magic Laser Feeeeeeeeeeeeels Your Pain


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    Liz Magic Laser, I Feel Your Pain (poster), 2012. Silkscreen on paper, 24 x 36 inches. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


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    Liz Magic Laser, I Feel Your Pain (Collages #9 and #14), 2011-2012. Photographs and colored pencil on Bristol board, 16 x 20 inches each. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


  • 022_nycu_artwork_laser

    Laser choreographed chase scenes from films such as M, Vertigo, American Psycho, and 28 Days Later into a series of fast-paced slippages in which villains become victims, witnesses become perpetrators, and the pursuer in one scene becomes the pursued in the next. Performers embody the historical arc of the staircase in cinema as it shifts from an arena of revolutionary struggle in Battleship Potemkin to the site of private trauma in films like The Shining.

    Liz Magic Laser Flight, 2011. Performance and single-channel video; 30 minutes. Performance view: Duffy Square, Times Square, New York City. Featuring actors Nic Grelli, Elizabeth Hodur, Liz Micek, Michael Wiener, Max Woertendyke, and Lia Woertendyke. With support from the Times Square Alliance and the Franklin Furnace Fund for Performance Art. Video made with producer David Guinan, director of photography Collin Kornfeind, camera Eric Yoon, and production manager Boman Modine of Polemic Media; sound engineer Kenny Lewis and sound editor Tim Wagner. Photo: Ka Man Tse. Courtesy Times Square Arts, the public art program of the Times Square Alliance. © Ka Man Tse


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    Laser choreographed chase scenes from films such as M, Vertigo, American Psycho, and 28 Days Later into a series of fast-paced slippages in which villains become victims, witnesses become perpetrators, and the pursuer in one scene becomes the pursued in the next. Performers embody the historical arc of the staircase in cinema as it shifts from an arena of revolutionary struggle in Battleship Potemkin to the site of private trauma in films like The Shining.

    Liz Magic Laser Flight, production stills, 2011. Performance and single-channel video; 30 minutes. Performance view: Duffy Square, Times Square, New York City. Featuring actors Nic Grelli, Elizabeth Hodur, Liz Micek, Michael Wiener, Max Woertendyke, and Lia Woertendyke. With support from the Times Square Alliance and the Franklin Furnace Fund for Performance Art. Video made with producer David Guinan, director of photography Collin Kornfeind, camera Eric Yoon, and production manager Boman Modine of Polemic Media; sound engineer Kenny Lewis and sound editor Tim Wagner. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


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    Liz Magic Laser, Flight (poster), 2011. Inkjet print; 24 x 36 inches. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser.


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    Laser choreographed chase scenes from films such as M, Vertigo, American Psycho, and 28 Days Later into a series of fast-paced slippages in which villains become victims, witnesses become perpetrators, and the pursuer in one scene becomes the pursued in the next. Performers embody the historical arc of the staircase in cinema as it shifts from an arena of revolutionary struggle in Battleship Potemkin to the site of private trauma in films like The Shining.

    Liz Magic Laser, Flight, 2010. Performance and single-channel video; 30 minutes. Performance view: MoMA PS1, Long Island City. Featuring actors Nic Grelli, Elizabeth Hodur, Liz Micek, Michael Wiener, Max Woertendyke, and Lia Woertendyke. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


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    Laser staged Bertolt Brecht’s play Man Equals Man (Mann Ist Mann) in the ATM vestibules of banks throughout New York City, working in collaboration with nine actors who delivered their lines to the bank’s ATM machines and unsuspecting patrons. Videotaping each actor’s performance separately, the element of estrangement in the original play is heightened through jump cuts and spatiotemporal shifts.

    Liz Magic Laser, chase, production still, 2009-10. Video installation; 145 minutes. Performance view: Seventh and 37th St Branch of Washington Mutual, NY, June 22, 2009. Featuring actor Andra Eggleston as Galy Gay (an Irish porter) in Bertolt Brecht’s Man Equals Man (Mann Ist Mann) (1926). The soldiers blindfold Galy Gay and pretend to put him in front of the firing squad. The performance work for chase was developed in collaboration with actors Annika Boras, Andra Eggleston, Gary Lai, Liz Micek, Justin Sayre, Doug Walter, Michael Wiener, Max Woertendyke, and Cat Yezbak. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


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    Laser staged Bertolt Brecht’s play Man Equals Man (Mann Ist Mann) in the ATM vestibules of banks throughout New York City, working in collaboration with nine actors who delivered their lines to the bank’s ATM machines and unsuspecting patrons. Videotaping each actor’s performance separately, the element of estrangement in the original play is heightened through jump cuts and spatiotemporal shifts.

    Liz Magic Laser, chase, production still, 2009-10. Video installation; 145 minutes. Performance view: 52 Broadway Branch of Amalgamated Bank, New York, June 14, 2009. Featuring actor Michael Weiner as Jeraiah Jip (a private in the British Army) in Bertolt Brecht’s Man Equals Man (Mann Ist Mann) (1926). Jip finally finds his comrades and they act like they don’t know him in Scene 11. The performance work for chase was developed in collaboration with actors Annika Boras, Andra Eggleston, Gary Lai, Liz Micek, Justin Sayre, Doug Walter, Michael Wiener, Max Woertendyke, and Cat Yezbak. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


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    Laser staged Bertolt Brecht’s play Man Equals Man (Mann Ist Mann) in the ATM vestibules of banks throughout New York City, working in collaboration with nine actors who delivered their lines to the bank’s ATM machines and unsuspecting patrons. Videotaping each actor’s performance separately, the element of estrangement in the original play is heightened through jump cuts and spatiotemporal shifts.

    Liz Magic Laser, chase, production still, 2009-10. Video installation; 145 minutes. Performance view: Brooklyn Heights Branch of TD Bank, Brooklyn, June 9, 2009. Featuring actor Liz Micek as Mrs. Galy Gay (wife of the porter) in Bertolt Brecht’s Man Equals Man (Mann Ist Mann) (1926). Mrs. Gay finds her husband at the beer wagon and he pretends not to know her in Scene 8. The performance work for chase was developed in collaboration with actors Annika Boras, Andra Eggleston, Gary Lai, Liz Micek, Justin Sayre, Doug Walter, Michael Wiener, Max Woertendyke, and Cat Yezbak. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


  • 029_nycu_artwork_laser

    Laser staged Bertolt Brecht’s play Man Equals Man (Mann Ist Mann) in the ATM vestibules of banks throughout New York City, working in collaboration with nine actors who delivered their lines to the bank’s ATM machines and unsuspecting patrons. Videotaping each actor’s performance separately, the element of estrangement in the original play is heightened through jump cuts and spatiotemporal shifts.

    Liz Magic Laser, chase, production still, 2009-10. Video installation; 145 minutes. Performance view: Korea Town West 32nd St Branch of Citibank, New York, June 19, 2009. Featuring actor Gary Lai as Mr. Wang (bonze of a Tibetan pagoda) in Bertolt Brecht’s Man Equals Man (Mann Ist Mann) (1926). Wang offers his captive soldier some beefsteak in Scene 7. The performance work for chase was developed in collaboration with actors Annika Boras, Andra Eggleston, Gary Lai, Liz Micek, Justin Sayre, Doug Walter, Michael Wiener, Max Woertendyke, and Cat Yezbak. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


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    Laser staged Bertolt Brecht’s play Man Equals Man (Mann Ist Mann) in the ATM vestibules of banks throughout New York City, working in collaboration with nine actors who delivered their lines to the bank’s ATM machines and unsuspecting patrons. Videotaping each actor’s performance separately, the element of estrangement in the original play is heightened through jump cuts and spatiotemporal shifts.

    Liz Magic Laser, chase, production still, 2009-10. Video installation; 145 minutes. Performance view: Fifth Ave and 27th St Branch of Chase, NY, New York, June 21, 2009. Featuring actor Max Woertendyke as Uriah Shelly (a private in the British Army) in Bertolt Brecht’s Man Equals Man (Mann Ist Mann) (1926). Uriah conspires to build an artificial elephant to trick Galy Gay in Scene 9. The performance work for chase was developed in collaboration with actors Annika Boras, Andra Eggleston, Gary Lai, Liz Micek, Justin Sayre, Doug Walter, Michael Wiener, Max Woertendyke, and Cat Yezbak. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


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    Liz Magic Laser, Elephant Calf, 2010. Costume designed by Liz Magic Laser with Felicia Garcia-Rivera. The performance work for Elephant Calf was developed in collaboration with actors Annika Boras, Justin Sayre, Doug Walter, Michael Wiener, Max Woertendyke, and Cat Yezbak. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


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    Liz Magic Laser, Elephant Calf, 2010. Performance view: Derek Eller Gallery, New York. The performance work for Elephant Calf was developed in collaboration with actors Annika Boras, Justin Sayre, Doug Walter, Michael Wiener, Max Woertendyke, and Cat Yezbak. Photo: Mia Tramz. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


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    Liz Magic Laser, Elephant Calf, 2010. Performance view: Derek Eller Gallery, New York. The performance work for Elephant Calf was developed in collaboration with actors Annika Boras, Justin Sayre, Doug Walter, Michael Wiener, Max Woertendyke, and Cat Yezbak. Photo: Mia Tramz. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


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    Liz Magic Laser, Mine, 2009. Single-channel video (22 minutes) and assemblage, produced via the da Vinci Surgical System. Installation view: Greater New York, MoMA PS1, Long Island City. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


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    Liz Magic Laser and Dafna Maimon, Service, video stills, 2009. Single channel video; 15 minutes. Featuring actors Neal Bledsoe and Annika Boras, with Stephanie Dodes, Felicia Garcia-Rivera, Oliver Jones, Vicki Khuzami, Eldad Lev, MaryKate Maher, Mores McWreath, Liz Micek, Ana Munteanu, James Osbiston, and Haim Shemesh. Video made with director of photography David Guinan, camera Gilad Ratman, and sound operator Alex Passapera. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


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    Liz Magic Laser and Felicia Garcia-Rivera, Bend, production still, 2008. Single-channel video; 7 minutes. Featuring bikers The Rough Riders and voice Cori Kresge. Video made with director of photography David Guinan, camera Michael Dowd and Gilad Ratman. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


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    Liz Magic Laser, Deposit, 2008. Digital c-print; 10 x 15 inches. Courtesy the artist. © Liz Magic Laser


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